The President “Responds”!

Okay, now I support the President, but I’m not a fan of everything he has done over his two terms.  What President has done everything perfectly well throughout their term?  Anyway, he has done tremendous things for mental health.  For instance, he finally fully enacted Patrick Kennedy’s Mental Health Parity Act of 2008.  So, kudos.  I decided to write him and ask for a meeting. Yes, I know I had a snowball’s chance in hell of actually getting that meeting.  If I didn’t ask, then I would never get it.  I knew this meeting was never going to happen, but in that letter I also let him know what it was like for those us living with mental illness. What it’s like navigating the mental health care system.  The stigma we face in the workplace, home, hospital, school…   I thanked him for what he had done so far.  I urged him to continue to do more.  I did explain that I was also an advocate.  How I have actively helped pass laws locally and nationally.  How I’ve worked with soldiers on and off military bases.  How I work with students.  This was the response…

Dear Susan:

Thank you for writing.  I have heard from many Americans whose lives have been affected by mental health problems, and I appreciate your taking the time to share your thoughts.

As you may be aware, in any given year one in five adults experiences a mental illness such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or post-traumatic stress, and many others are troubled by significant emotional and psychological distress—especially in times of hardship or difficulty.  They are our family members, friends, and neighbors, and I believe there are things we must all do to help.  As a Nation, we can strive to eliminate the barriers that still keep people from accessing life-changing treatments.  We can also make sure every person struggling with psychological and emotional pain knows that asking for help is not a sign of weakness—taking action is a sign of strength.

My Administration has worked hard to help increase mental health services and improve access to care.  We are working with community health centers to expand the availability of behavioral and mental health services across the country, including in rural areas.  And thanks to the Affordable Care Act, over 60 million Americans now have expanded mental health and substance use disorder benefits and parity protections.  This law also prohibits insurers from denying coverage because of pre-existing conditions like a diagnosis of mental illness, and it requires most insurance plans to cover recommended preventive services without copays.  Additionally, as part of the BRAIN initiative, we are supporting innovative research that aims to revolutionize our understanding of how the brain works and uncover new ways to address conditions like depression.

We continue to support our troops and veterans.  I signed the Clay Hunt Suicide Prevention for American Veterans Act on February 12, 2015, which authorized additional steps to address mental health and prevent suicide.  The year before, I announced 19 Executive actions that make it easier for members of our Armed Forces and veterans to access the care they need, when they need it—including a new policy that will ensure the continuity of medication for mental health problems as service members transition to care at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA).  The VA has also worked to increase mental health staffing, enhance community partnerships, and expand the capacity of the Veterans Crisis Line.

To learn more about mental health assistance and health care reform, please visit www.MentalHealth.gov or www.HealthCare.gov.  Calling 1-800-662-HELP is also a free, confidential way to receive a treatment referral or further information. 

Again, thank you for writing.  Michelle and I—like so many Americans—have known people who have experienced mental health problems, and we understand the effects these illnesses have on their lives and on their families.  We must continue to work toward better prevention and treatment, and as caring individuals, we must do what we can to ensure those with mental health issues get the care and support they need and deserve.

Sincerely,

Barack Obama

I do realize that the President did not write this email to me.  I also realize that the person who did, obviously did not read a word of the letter I sent.  Yes, I snail mailed a letter…the old fashioned way.  Although I did expect this, I am a bit saddened by it.  As an advocate, I am well aware of all the stats.  I certainly don’t need to learn to go the .gov sites.  I didn’t expect the President to actually read the letter, but at least a staffer would have been nice.  I know I’m no one important.  I don’t have that much of an inflated ego.  It’s just interesting.  Imagine if we all wrote letters and sent them on the same day.  I wonder if we would all get the same response or if someone would actually take notice.  Hmmm.

*Please do not make any negative political comments.  I know not everyone is a fan of the President.

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